exam

Almost Perfect

Almost Perfect

The decision to allow students to retake exams and every conversation surrounding it should be based on the best path for learning. Always remember that.

 

Lately, I was grappling with the question: "Is a full exam retake necessary and effective for each student whose score is almost perfect?" The question came up because, invariably, every class has those  students who earn a 94% but still want to retake the exam and shoot for 100%. I will always allow this, but recently I was wondering if a retake is the best way to earn that extra 6%. I asked myself, "What would help this person increase his or her understanding from nearly perfect to perfect?" For such a student, I think retaking the exam is too mechanical, an trivial item on a checklist to achieve perfection. By contrast, I've heard it said you've never truly mastered something until you can teach it.

Paired Assessments – Creating a Better Exam

I've said this before, but I'll say it again: I hate tests. It's not just that traditional exams fail to simulate a real life, collaborative working environment in which one can consult outside resources, it's so much more than that. Traditional exams actually discourage students from developing necessary life skills.  With traditional exams, memorization is prioritized over resourcefulness and individual performance is prioritized over accountability and collaboration.

Despite my strong opinions, over the course of my teaching career and out of pressure to have my students perform well on the State or College Board standardized exams, I have implemented the whole gamut of test preparation strategies and intensities. That my students are accountable to an essentially arbitrary end-of-year examination is something I have just had to accept as a fact of life. My supervisors understand this and more importantly, my students and their parents understand this. Without a massive shift in education, in one academic year I cannot choose to ignore the exam track and change the thinking of my students. I am forced to work with it.