Old Testament

Closure

Closure

Some prophesies in the Bible are fulfilled twice. The first time is in an immediate but transient way  and the second time is in an ultimate and eternal way. For instance, as Isaac follows Abraham up the mountain and asks about the lamb for the sacrifice, Abraham answers that God will provide a lamb. On that day, God does provide the sacrifice, but in Jesus Christ, God truly provides the sacrifice. When the Israelites cover their doors with blood at Passover, they are saved by the blood of the lamb, and in Jesus Christ, they are truly saved by the blood of the lamb. Throughout Kings, when God sheds mercy on Judah, he cites his promise to keep the line of David on the throne forever, but then we read about the travesty of the line of kings following David. In Jesus Christ, God truly keeps the line of David on the throne forever.

This pattern can also be observed in the case of a particularly striking prophesy made by Isaiah during the reign of Hezekiah's father, Ahaz. Recall when Judah was invaded by the kings of Israel and Aram. At that time, Ahaz was approached by Isaiah and told not to fear but to trust in God and ask for a sign. Ahaz turned from Isaiah and took matters into his own hands, but Isaiah would not be ignored. As Ahaz turned his back, Isaiah proclaimed that there would be a sign despite Ahaz' disobedience. The sign he gives him is one of the most famous prophesies in the entire Bible and is even quoted in the very first chapter of Matthew.

Remnant

Remnant

If I asked you to name a miracle in the Bible, you might say "the ten plagues" or "the parting of the Red Sea" or "the resurrection of Jesus". These miracles are more than just well known miracles, they are moments that shaped history. The ten plagues are remembered every time Passover is celebrated. The parting of the Red Sea was an event that liberated the Israelites and gave birth to a new nation. Easter is the grounds upon which all of Christianity is founded. Even for someone who doesn't believe in miracles, these mysterious and unexplainable events undeniably changed the world.

This story is about a miracle that is no less awesome or deserving, but no one ever thinks of it. Personally, I have never heard it taught in church. It won't be found in an illustrated children's Bible and, while it is printed in every edition of the Bible, most people who read it either skim over it or forget it entirely.

Who Turns Back Hearts

Who Turns Back Hearts

First, let me just say Part 2 is about my all time favorite Bible character, Elijah. I could write a series on just Elijah, but the purpose of this series is to focus on the overarching story. I omitted details from Part 1 to achieve this and I intend to treat Part 2 the same way, despite my utter fascination with 1 Kings 17 - 2 Kings 7. If you are interested in anything you read here, I would encourage you to do your own study of these chapters.

The books of Kings tell at least two stories. As the name implies, one of those stories is a chronicle of the kings of Israel and Judah. This story is corroborated by the books of 1 and 2 Chronicles. The second story is that of the prophets. If the first story is about what is happening on Earth, the second story is about what is happening in heaven. The first story describes the evil reigns of Jeroboam and Ahab, the second story describes God's response to them.

Prophesy of Bones

Prophesy of Bones

This is a story from the Tanakh, or what Christians call the "Old Testament". I'm actually growing rather fond of the former of these two names because 'Old' Testament seriously downplays its relevance. For reasons that will be made clear, I would frankly prefer to call it the "Awesome Testament" or maybe just the "Wow, That's Both Terrifying and Amazing" book. Anyway, I've chosen to call this story "An Epic Bible Story You've Never Heard" because it comes from two books of the Tenakh that get very little attention in church, but definitely deserves to be heard. This series is a condensed version of about 35 chapters. I've broken it into six parts: one part per week for six weeks.